Manga Review: My Little Monster Vol. 6

There’s the type of shojo manga where a girl really can envision herself as the heroine. And then there are those where the characters are constantly going off the deep end. My Little Monster falls into the latter category, and if your taste in high school romance leans toward the improbable and wacky, this title might be up your alley. Kodansha  has just released Volume 6 of the English translation, and you can read on for the review. (For my review of previous volumes, click here.)

Back Cover Blurb

Valentine’s Day, which is coincidentally Shizuku’s birthday, fast approaches and the girls decide to cook up some truelove chocolates for the boys of their desire. A fun cooking party gets awkward and tense when Oshima-san and Shizuku confront the fact that they’re both making chocolates for Haru! Will Oshima back down as she always does? Given Haru’s obsession with Shizuku, will it even matter?

The Review

Volume 5 had a Natsume-centric chapter, and Sasayan gets a turn in Volume 6. Of the cast, he’s my favorite character, mainly because he’s the most normal. Despite this chance to get inside his head, why he decided to join Haru’s circle remains unclear. Yet he genuinely wants the best for Haru. His bringing Haru along for an afternoon with the guys not only shows how far Haru’s come (and has yet to go) but how considerate Sasayan is toward him. Still, despite his keen perception, Sasayan’s a high school kid, and there’s a particularly funny panel where he and Haru both gripe about girl problems.

The girls have their own problems with the arrival of Valentine’s Day, which is generally the setting for chocolates and confessions. Even though it also happens to be Shizuku’s birthday, the arc begins with a focus on secondary character Oshima. After a rather artistic and revealing chocolate making session at Shizuku’s house, Oshima makes the uncharacteristically bold move of calling Haru out on Valentine’s Day. Their meeting is anything but romantic, yet Haru moves Oshima with his own brand of consideration while Oshima imparts insight that helps Haru a step further to becoming a more aware human being.

The story then shifts to Shizuku’s Valentines/birthday celebration. Interestingly, her thoughts seem equally split between Haru and her ever absent mother. A series of flashbacks reveal more of Shizuku’s childhood, and though you have to wonder what exactly Shizuku’s mom does for a living, Robico-sensei paints a poignant picture of the restraint Shizuku exercises whenever her mother’s concerned. As such, she’s especially vulnerable when Haru surprises her, and thanks to recent lessons learned through Sasayan and Oshima, Haru manages to make it a sweetly memorable Valentines night for them both.

Extras include bonus four-panel comics, two short bonus manga, an afterword from the mangaka, and translation notes.

In Summary

Haru is slowly expanding his horizons. Volume 6 is mainly Haru-induced wackiness and embarrassment as his friends guide him on how to function within society. Fortunately, some of their lessons actually get through and pay off in a major way in an unexpectedly tender Valentine’s Day moment.

First published at the Fandom Post.

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