Tag Archives: The royal tutor

Manga Review: The Royal Tutor Vol. 5

Rich, handsome young men, each with his own distinct personality…this type of bishounen cast is a staple in shojo manga. And if you like yours with a generous helping of chibi humor, you should definitely check out Higasa Akai’s The Royal Tutor. Read on for my review of Volume 5. (For my reviews of other volumes, click here.)

Back Cover Blurb

Prince Licht’s fascination with coffee should come as no surprise given his affinity for his part-time job at the cafe, but when Leonhard suggests the bitter drink should be banned from the kingdom, can Lichie help him develop an appreciation?

The Review

After Bruno’s internal angst regarding his chances for the throne, Akai-sensei opens Volume 5 with lighter fare, a coffee-themed interlude between Heine, Licht, and Leonhard. Leonhard, as usual, plays the part of the immature prince, but this time his childish tastes pose a challenge for Licht, not Heine. Their confrontation has the feel of a comedy duo, and with Heine mostly observing rather than getting directly involved, it’s a nice change of pace from Heine’s usual schooling.

Comedy also comes in the cute variety in the standalone chapter “Adele’s Friend.” The little princess returns to demand a visit to the zoo, and of course, her brothers (plus Heine) accompany her. It has a very similar feel to the group art class of Volume 4, except this time the unique points of the princes’ personalities get highlighted in the context of animals, which range from cute to ferocious to troublesome.

The rest of the volume is devoted to a past incident involving Bruno and Kai with the focus mainly on Kai. While the story has a 19th-century setting, our characters often display modern sensitivities, and the princes’ normal garb look a lot like Japanese school uniforms. In keeping with this bridging of past and present, Akai-sensei delivers a situation at a military academy that looks a lot like modern high school bullying. Because this arc centers on Kai, much is made about the contrast between his scary looks and his actual gentle nature, but on top of that, we get to see the circumstances that actually would push Kai to violence.

Unfortunately, Heine gets turned into a deus ex machina for the arc’s resolution. While the conclusion is a bit too tidy for belief, it does increase the aura of mystery surrounding the diminutive tutor. It also drives Count Rosenberg, the steward of the eldest prince, to confront Heine, and I anticipate an increasing amount of court intrigue to come.

Extras include bonus manga printed on the inside of the cover; six-page bonus story; and first page printed in color.

In Summary

Kai fans will have a lot to enjoy in this installment. Not only do we get a glimpse into his brief stint in a military academy, we also see how Heine’s influence has shaped him and Kai’s particular take on conflict resolution. And though the eldest prince has yet to show his face, his meddling in his brothers’ affairs is becoming increasingly apparent, and I look forward to him finally making an appearance.

First published at The Fandom Post.

 

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Manga Review: The Royal Tutor Vol. 4

Rich, handsome young men, each with his own distinct personality…this type of bishounen cast is a staple in shojo manga. And if you like yours with a generous helping of chibi humor, you should definitely check out Higasa Akai’s The Royal Tutor. Read on for my review of Volume 4. (For reviews of other volumes, click here.)

Back Cover Blurb

Heine’s efforts to shape the princelings into worthy successors to the throne continue, but it seems that Bruno in particular is struggling with a bit of a crisis of conscience when it comes to his future. Can he live up to Heine’s standards to remain his “apprentice”? More importantly, does he have the courage to carve out his own path?

The Review

As with Volume 3, half the material in Volume 4 was not incorporated into the TV series. Most of the non-animated chapters are at the beginning of the book and comprise, for the most part, humorous fluff that poke fun at the princes’ quirks. The volume opens with a group art lesson in which the princes must paint a portrait of little sister Adele. What results is a cute, light-hearted chapter that displays our cast’s idiosyncrasies on canvas.

The remainder of the book has Heine dealing with the princes in ones and twos as it often does. Chapter 20 “A Troubled Prince!?” is a brief Leonhard-centric arc which, like most chapters about the fourth prince, is a display of his dismal academics. Unfortunately, this iteration doesn’t vary much from previous ones so I found the gags stale. However, the next chapter, which features Licht, is much more intriguing. Cafe fans will get to enjoy the youngest prince in his waiter uniform while he attempts to pry into Heine’s private life.

As we enter the material included in the anime, the narrative takes a more serious tone. Heine’s job is to groom the princes as worthy candidates for the throne, but we’ve never seen the brothers treat each other as rivals. This changes with Chapter 22. Although the set up is somewhat different than the TV series, it similarly introduces Bruno’s hidden insecurities and sets the stage well for the two Bruno-centric chapters that follow. Thus far, Bruno has alternated between a rigid academic and a gushing Heine fanboy. In this arc, we see the circumstances that led to his strict lifestyle as well as a glimpse of his sense of self-worth. Of all the princes, Bruno is the one most firmly grounded in reality, and to watch him agonize over the options for his future goes a long way in fleshing out his character.

Extras include “Character Profiles” printed on the inside of the cover; one page “intermission” manga; first page printed in color; and translation notes.

In Summary

Volume 4 delivers a nice balance of comedy and drama. We first get three fun standalone chapters that feature the brothers’ affection toward their cute sister, Leonhard’s stupidity, and Licht’s acute sense of perception. The focus then shifts to the line of succession, and more specifically, the person Prince Bruno considers his chief rival for the throne. Not only do these chapters shape Bruno into a more well-rounded character, they also heighten the sense that someone is out to sabotage the four brothers’ chances to become king.

First published at The Fandom Post.

Manga Review: The Royal Tutor Vol. 3

Rich, handsome young men, each with his own distinct personality…this type of bishounen cast is a staple in shojo manga. And if you like yours with a generous helping of chibi humor, you should definitely check out Higasa Akai’s The Royal Tutor. Read on for my review of Volume 3. (For my reviews of other volumes, click here.)

Back Cover Blurb

Sometimes kind, sometimes strict, Heine is prepared to employ any means necessary to draw forth his princeling students’ potential. But seriously, what’s a royal tutor got to do to enjoy a simple, quiet day off?? With royal engagements, reluctant readers, and secret lives seemingly everywhere he turns, Heine may need to up his game if this kingdom is to have any hope for the future at all!

The Review

For those familiar with the anime, half of Volume 3 is material that was not included in the TV series. If you are a fan of Prince Kai, you will want to pick up this volume for Chapter 13 alone. Up till now, the only females in the bishounen-heavy cast have been the princes’ grandmother and 3-year-old sister. Now we get one more: Beatrix Von Lothringen, a cousin—and Kai’s betrothed.

She’s a bit of a surprise since none of the royals have mentioned anything about engagements, but it does make sense for princes to have arranged marriages. Beatrix, though, is more than just a fiancée. Having been raised with the princes, she treats them like an older sister, and Kai’s sharp glance doesn’t intimidate her at all. Rather, she feels affection for Kai and somewhat inadequate as a woman (did I mention she cross-dresses?). Chapter 13 is her attempt at a romantic picnic with Kai, but her efforts get thwarted one after another in comic fashion. It doesn’t help that fluff-obsessed Kai isn’t exactly the sort to drop sweet nothings into a lady’s ear. However, the chapter does conclude with a swoon-worthy illustration of the two that made my heart skip a beat.

The story then shifts to a chapter about Leonhard’s woeful academics, which to be honest is starting to get old, before returning to the subject of marriage. This time the focus is teensy sister Adele, who’s just had the realization she’s to be sent to a foreign land to be married one day. A pretend engagement with Heine results, and in addition to the brothers’ varied reactions at the thought of their tutor as brother in-law, the mangaka serves up adorable pictures of Adele and Heine. Because even though Heine’s an adult, he still looks like a kid, and visually speaking, Adele matches up with him pretty well. We also get the first mention of the royal brood’s mother in this chapter. However, it remains unclear where Mom is and what happened to her.

The narrative then matches up with the anime once again with Heine chancing upon Licht waiting tables at Cafe Mitter Meyer. While the idea of Licht having a part-time job seems a flimsy excuse for the mangaka to draw bishounen in waiter uniforms (though admittedly, they look quite dashing), it does add depth to our playboy character. More importantly, we get the introduction of “The Count.” Until now, the princes haven’t had enemies other than their own personality quirks, but the addition of an outside adversary should put more backbone to the plot.

Extras include comics printed on the inside of the back cover flap; a two-page bonus manga; first page printed in color; and translation notes.

In Summary

A new character, and a female one at that! Prince Kai’s boyish fiancee joins the cast and provides a bit of random background on the royal family. The betrothal fun continues with a pretend engagement between Heine and Princess Adele before the narrative dives into a longer arc about Licht. While most of the story just seems to be an excuse to have Licht and Viktor in a cafe setting, it does introduce a new sinister element to the plot with the meddling of the Count.

First published at The Fandom Post.

Manga Review: The Royal Tutor Vol. 2

Rich, handsome young men, each with his own distinct personality…this type of bishounen cast is a staple in shojo manga. And if you like yours with a generous helping of chibi humor, you should definitely check out Higasa Akai’s The Royal Tutor. Read on for my review of Volume 2. (For my reviews of other volumes, click here.)

Back Cover Blurb

When the king returns to court, it’s time for the princes to prove their mettle. But not everyone’s been exactly keeping up with Heine’s lessons… (Hint: It’s the prince who only scored a one on his assessment test…and that was for signing his name!) Can Heine really whip these boys into shape well enough to rule a country?

The Review

Volume 1 presented our princely cast and their tutor, and now that the characters have been introduced, lessons can begin in earnest, starting with a field trip into town. That might seem like a strange place to begin, until we learn that only resident playboy Licht has any common sense about how to behave around commoners. Haughty and academically-challenged Leonhard easily lends himself to be made the fool, but all the princes provide something different to laugh at during their outing. In addition to the setting highlighting their foibles, they get to wear something other than their usual uniform-like garb, and readers get a sense of the type of city Weinner is.

Next, we meet the man who literally rules the place. There’s been no mention or sign of a queen (other than the granny Queen Mother), but there’s definitely a king. Given that 17-year old Kai is the second eldest son, I expected the king to be past his prime. Instead, he is a longhaired bishounen who could easily pass for one of his sons. His personality also veers more towards sentimental than kingly. Even so, he’s serious when he must be, and he and Heine share a past that they’re keeping from the princes.

Meanwhile, the princes are surprisingly eager to make their father proud. Given that they’ve driven so many tutors from the palace, I thought they would be more troublesome, but when the king points out areas of improvement, the princes immediately get to work on it. In addition, although the princes are rivals for the throne, they are more than willing to help each other out. So when the king threatens to strip Leonhard of his claim to the throne because of his awful test score, his brothers try to help him learn. When Kai expresses a desire to interact better with people, the other princes offer suggestions and encouragement. Thus, the story includes jokes about Leonhard’s epic stupidity and comic visuals of Kai’s attempts to be approachable, but backstabbing doesn’t play a part. As exemplified in Chapter 12 (the only chapter in this volume with no equivalent in the anime), the princes are brothers first and deeply care for one another’s well-being.

By the way, the quality of the illustrations remains top notch, with the style switching between elegant and chibi as the scene demands.

Extras include bonus manga printed on the inside of the cover flaps; first page printed in color; a note from the creator; and translation notes.

In Summary

Despite the appearance of the king and talk of rivalry and succession, the mood remains light and fun with the princes going to town, then striving to improve themselves as candidates for the throne. Though Leonhard tends to draw the spotlight with his outspoken personality and staggering stupidity, Akai-sensei does a good job of helping us to get to know all the princes. As of yet, there’s no overarching goal other than Heine whipping them into shape, but for the moment, that’s entertaining enough.

First published at The Fandom Post.

Manga Review: The Royal Tutor Vol. 1

Rich, handsome young men, each with his own distinct personality…this type of bishounen cast is a staple in shojo manga. And if you like yours with a generous helping of chibi humor, you should definitely check out Higasa Akai’s The Royal Tutor. Read on for my review of Volume 1 (For my reviews of other volumes, click here.).

Back Cover Blurb

Accepting the post of Royal Tutor at the court of the king of Grannzreich, Heine Wittgenstein is a little professor with a big job ahead! Each of the kingdom’s four princes has a rather distinct personality. Does their diminutive new instructor have what it takes to lay down some learning? It’s a comedy of educational proportions!

The Review

The Royal Tutor is an interesting take on the reverse harem genre. It includes several standard elements including four handsome princes and a luxurious, palatial setting. However, the protagonist is not a teenage girl through whom readers can live vicariously. Our main character is the princes’ tutor, Heine Wittgenstein.

Summoned to the royal palace by the King of Granzreich himself, Heine is charged with grooming the king’s troublesome younger sons into suitable candidates for the throne. Heine though is not your ordinary academic. Although he is an adult with a certain degree of weakness for female charms, he looks like (and is constantly mistaken for) a little boy. Yet his intellect is second to none, and he is physically capable of chasing down his much larger students. At the same time, his small stature causes all sorts of inconveniences, which affords ample opportunity for visual humor, and he occasionally gets handled like a plushie toy. In fact, Heine at times looks like a cute mascot for this princely lineup.

As such, there are no romantic overtones whatsoever between this teacher and his students. (In fact, the only females in the cast are the princes’ grandmother and three-year old sister.) Even so, Heine, like many reverse harem heroines, is able to win over these difficult bishounen in short order. Despite its late 19th century European setting, these princes have very modern sensibilities and of course extremely distinct personalities. Thus, we have Kai, the taciturn delinquent; Bruno, the rigid intellectual; Leonhard, the prideful athlete; and Licht, the frivolous playboy. These brothers have driven all preceding royal tutors to resignation, yet Heine is able to quickly discern the true natures behind their public facades and earn their acceptance.

Heine himself though is a bit of a mystery. For all his abilities, he has no formal credentials. And although he was summoned to the palace by the king, Heine has his own–and as of yet unknown– personal agenda for accepting the position. While this does make him more intriguing as a character, Volume 1 is for the most part lighthearted comedy stemming from Heine’s unusual appearance and abilities and the princes’ antics.

For those familiar with the anime, the storyline is not an exact match for the TV series, but it is pretty close. The artwork is clean and well-drawn with lots of chandeliers and Rococo style decor and dress. Character designs alternate between shojo-style bishounen and chibi-style for princes and tutor alike (although Heine gets chibified more frequently than anyone else).

Extras include bonus manga printed on the inside of the cover flaps; first page printed in color; a note from the creator; and translation notes.

In Summary

If you’re the type that enjoys princely eye-candy against a luxurious backdrop, you’ll probably like The Royal Tutor. This series is also worth checking out if you like light comedies with characters that don’t fit the mold. The bishounen princes are somewhat standard, but their tutor is in a class of his own in this near reverse harem comedy.

First published at The Fandom Post.